What Iran is truly about

I’m just a proud Iranian who felt that there was a need for a blog on tumblr that depicted the true Iran and its incredible people.

I will be posting anything that will relate to Iran’s history, culture, media, people, and current events. Feel free to send me any questions, comments, or pictures.

* Ask me

amst3rdamned:

vintage-kisses:

harrystyleshisgirl:

If I’d ask you, who is Joseph Kony, you wouldn’t know. You should. And that’s why I’m going to tell you about him.
Joseph Kony considers himself as a good Christian. He abducts kids, makes little girls go in prostitution, makes little boys become kid soldiers and force them to do horrible things, things a kid isn’t supposed to do. Neither is an adult, no one is. He started the LRA, Lord’s Resistance Army. 20.000 kids have been kidnapped, this needs to stop. And that’s why we need to Make Kony Famous. Let the world know about the horrible things he does, and the thousands of children and parents suffering. 
So come together, at the April the 20th. That is the day, we will cover the night. People in all kind of cities, all over the world meet at sundown & cover the city with posters and stickers of Joseph Kony. To Make Kony Famous. If you want to help these kids and parents, cover the night at 4/20/2012.
Not clear enough? Please watch: http://vimeo.com/37119711


THE LEAST YOU CAN DO IS REBLOG TO TO RAISE AWARENESS. 

EVERYONE please read and watch this immediately. It is 30 minutes, worth every SINGLE second of it. Share it with everyone. Talk about it, facebook it, tweet it, do everything you can! Tell ALL your friends and family. Go go go! He must be stopped.  View high resolution

amst3rdamned:

vintage-kisses:

harrystyleshisgirl:

If I’d ask you, who is Joseph Kony, you wouldn’t know. You should. And that’s why I’m going to tell you about him.

Joseph Kony considers himself as a good Christian. 
He abducts kids, makes little girls go in prostitution, makes little boys become kid soldiers and force them to do horrible things, things a kid isn’t supposed to do. Neither is an adult, no one is. He started the LRA, Lord’s Resistance Army. 20.000 kids have been kidnapped, this needs to stop. And that’s why we need to Make Kony Famous. Let the world know about the horrible things he does, and the thousands of children and parents suffering. 

So come together, at the April the 20th. That is the day, we will cover the night. People in all kind of cities, all over the world meet at sundown & cover the city with posters and stickers of Joseph Kony. To Make Kony Famous. If you want to help these kids and parents, cover the night at 4/20/2012.

Not clear enough? Please watch: http://vimeo.com/37119711

THE LEAST YOU CAN DO IS REBLOG TO TO RAISE AWARENESS. 

EVERYONE please read and watch this immediately. It is 30 minutes, worth every SINGLE second of it. Share it with everyone. Talk about it, facebook it, tweet it, do everything you can! Tell ALL your friends and family. Go go go! He must be stopped. 

(Source: daisylight, via lightourbones)

Amid the glib militarism of Republican presidential candidates, the bellicosity of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and the nuclear recklessness of the mullahs, “A Separation” drives home the oft-ignored fact that Iran is full of educated, sophisticated and cultured people who don’t necessarily agree with their government either.

How Iran Produced The Best Film Of 2011—and What Americans Can Learn From It | The New Republic

joiesdevivre:

The Iranian film A Separation, written and directed by Asghar Farhadi, seems to me the best film of 2011. It is one of the Academy Award nominees for Best Foreign Picture, but by any sense of justice in any nation (let alone the self-assessed greatest in the world) it would have been nominated for Best Picture before anything else. The ways in which the characters in A Separation struggle for truth and honor, while yielding sometimes to compromise and falsehood, is not foreign to us. Few other films made last year give such a striking sense of, “Look—isn’t this life? Isn’t this our life, too?” In a complete world of film-going, we should no longer tolerate the label “foreign film,” especially since it seems likely that a film from France in which the French language remains tactfully silent is going to stroll away with Best Picture. The Artist is a pleasant soufflé, over which older Academy voters can wax nostalgic. But A Separation is what the cinema was invented for. 

I still need to see this. 

(Source: cundtcake)

At this time, many young Iranians all over this world are watching us, and I imagine them to be very happy. They are happy not just because of an important award, or a film or a filmmaker, but because at the time, in talk of war, intimidation and aggressions exchanged between politicians, the name of their country, Iran, is spoken here through her glorious culture — a rich and ancient culture that has been hidden under the heavy dust of politics. I proudly offer this award to the people of my country. A people who respect all cultures and civilizations, and despise hostility and resentment.

(via deathinspring-deactivated201301)

muslimwomeninhistory:

Cast of A Separation at the Oscars last night
Omid Safi: A Timely Win for Iran and For Peace
For the first time ever, an Iranian film, “A Separation”, has won the 2012 award for the best Foreign Language Film.    	At precisely the same time that the war machine in the United States  and Israel are ratcheting up talk of a unilateral or bilateral strike  against Iran,and driving yet another Muslim country to the brink of the samedisaster that has already been brought up on Iraq and Afghanistan, comes a movie (“A Separation”), a humble and peaceful director, Asghar Farhadi, who speaks in a universally recognizable language of humanity and humility, and a stunning Muslim actress (Leila Hatami) who has been an icon in Iranian cinema for a long time, conducts interviews fluently in four languages, and is an articulate, intelligent, and ardent supporter of the Reform movement (“Green Movement”) in Iran.
Read More at Religion News
View high resolution

muslimwomeninhistory:

Cast of A Separation at the Oscars last night

Omid Safi: A Timely Win for Iran and For Peace

For the first time ever, an Iranian film, “A Separation”, has won the 2012 award for the best Foreign Language Film.   At precisely the same time that the war machine in the United States and Israel are ratcheting up talk of a unilateral or bilateral strike against Iran,and driving yet another Muslim country to the brink of the samedisaster that has already been brought up on Iraq and Afghanistan, comes a movie (“A Separation”), a humble and peaceful director, Asghar Farhadi, who speaks in a universally recognizable language of humanity and humility, and a stunning Muslim actress (Leila Hatami) who has been an icon in Iranian cinema for a long time, conducts interviews fluently in four languages, and is an articulate, intelligent, and ardent supporter of the Reform movement (“Green Movement”) in Iran.

Read More at Religion News

souslarbre:

A Separation won the Oscar for best Foreign Language Filmr! The cast looks lovely. If you haven’t seen this movie, definitely watch it sometime soon.

SO SO SO SO SO proud and ecstatic about their win. Both my mom and I were crying because this is a truly historic moment for Iranians all over the world. I honestly can’t describe how happy it makes me that they received the credit they deserved for this incredible movie. YAYYY! View high resolution

souslarbre:

A Separation won the Oscar for best Foreign Language Filmr! The cast looks lovely. If you haven’t seen this movie, definitely watch it sometime soon.

SO SO SO SO SO proud and ecstatic about their win. Both my mom and I were crying because this is a truly historic moment for Iranians all over the world. I honestly can’t describe how happy it makes me that they received the credit they deserved for this incredible movie. YAYYY!

mohandasgandhi:

androphilia:

‘Muslim Schindler’ who risked life to save Iranian Jews in wartime Paris | Telegraph
A Muslim “Oskar Schindler” saved the lives of thousands of Iranian Jews in wartime Paris, risking all to help compatriots escape the Nazis, a new book claims.
By Henry Samuel, Paris
December 21, 2011
Abdol-Hossein Sardari, a junior Iranian diplomat, found himself almost by    accident in charge of Iran’s mission in Paris in 1940 and went on to help up    to 2,000 Iranian Jews flee France,    according to In the Lion’s Shadow.
But he only recently received posthumous recognition for his deeds.

Like Oskar Schindler, the German industrialist who saved more than 1,000 Jews    during the Holocaust by employing them in his factories, Mr Sardari cut an    unlikely saviour.


A bon vivant who fell in love with a Chinese opera singer, the trained lawyer    exploited the absurd rationale of Nazi racial purity laws at a time when    Adolf Hitler declared the officially neutral Iran an Aryan nation and    racially akin to the Germans.


Iranian Jews in Paris were still persecuted and forced to wear infamous yellow    patches on their clothes and have their documents stamped with their racial    identity.


But by cultivating his contacts with German and Vichy officials, Mr Sardari    somehow managed to win exemptions from Nazi race laws for at least 2,000    Iranian Jews by arguing that they did not have blood ties to European Jewry.

He claimed that despite the fact that some Iranians had followed the teachings    of the Prophet Moses for thousands of years, they had always been of Iranian    stock and therefore were “Mousaique” – Moses followers, which he    dubbed “Djuguten” – and not part of the Jewish race.
The book includes archives of Nazi official correspondence seeking “expert    opinion” on his claims. The racial purity specialists said that deeper    research was necessary on the Iranian sect, which the book suggests may have    been Mr Sardari’s invention, to ascertain whether its followers were Jewish    or not.
His other trump card was a new-style Iranian passport, created by the new    regime in Iran in 1925 but which most Europe-based Iranians did not possess.    The new identity papers made it much easier to travel across Europe.
His task became even more dangerous when Britain and Russia invaded Iran in    September 1941, when he was ordered by Tehran to return home as soon as    possible after it signed a treaty with the Allies. But he stayed on    regardless, using instead inheritance money to keep his office going after    being stripped of his diplomatic immunity and pay.
By December 1942, Adolf Eichmann, the senior Nazi in charge of Jewish affairs,    pronounced his argument “the usual Jewish tricks and attempts at    camouflage”, in a letter published in Mr Mokhtari’s book.
But Mr Sardari soldiered on, helping families escape from Paris just as tens    of thousands of Jews were being deported from France to death camps.
Eliane Senahi Cohanim was seven when she fled France with her family.
Mr Sardari provided them with the passports and travel documents they needed    for safe-passage out of Europe, which took a month.
“I think he was like Schindler, at that time, helping the Jews in Paris,”    the 78-year old told the BBC from her home in California.
Mr Sardari neither sought nor received much recognition for his efforts in his    lifetime and died lonely in a bedsit in Croydon, south London, in 1981.
He had lost his ambassador’s pension and Tehran properties in the Iranian    revolution.
His humanitarian work was belatedly recognised in 2004 at a ceremony at the    Simon Wiesenthal Centre in Los Angeles.
The author Fariborz Mokhtari said he hoped that the story, and the testimony    of survivors, would help undo “popular misconceptions” about Iran    and its people and show the “general cultural propensity of Iranians to    be tolerant”.
“Here you have a Muslim Iranian who goes out of his way, risks his life,    certainly risks his career and property and everything else, to save fellow    Iranians,” he says.
“There is no distinction ‘I am Muslim, he is Jew’ or whatever.”
[Image: Abdol-Hossein Sardari was a junior Iranian diplomat in 1940.]



Have I already reblogged this? Oh, I don’t care.
View high resolution

mohandasgandhi:

androphilia:

‘Muslim Schindler’ who risked life to save Iranian Jews in wartime Paris | Telegraph

A Muslim “Oskar Schindler” saved the lives of thousands of Iranian Jews in wartime Paris, risking all to help compatriots escape the Nazis, a new book claims.

By Henry Samuel, Paris

December 21, 2011

Abdol-Hossein Sardari, a junior Iranian diplomat, found himself almost by accident in charge of Iran’s mission in Paris in 1940 and went on to help up to 2,000 Iranian Jews flee France, according to In the Lion’s Shadow.

But he only recently received posthumous recognition for his deeds.

Like Oskar Schindler, the German industrialist who saved more than 1,000 Jews during the Holocaust by employing them in his factories, Mr Sardari cut an unlikely saviour.

A bon vivant who fell in love with a Chinese opera singer, the trained lawyer exploited the absurd rationale of Nazi racial purity laws at a time when Adolf Hitler declared the officially neutral Iran an Aryan nation and racially akin to the Germans.

Iranian Jews in Paris were still persecuted and forced to wear infamous yellow patches on their clothes and have their documents stamped with their racial identity.

But by cultivating his contacts with German and Vichy officials, Mr Sardari somehow managed to win exemptions from Nazi race laws for at least 2,000 Iranian Jews by arguing that they did not have blood ties to European Jewry.

He claimed that despite the fact that some Iranians had followed the teachings of the Prophet Moses for thousands of years, they had always been of Iranian stock and therefore were “Mousaique” – Moses followers, which he dubbed “Djuguten” – and not part of the Jewish race.

The book includes archives of Nazi official correspondence seeking “expert opinion” on his claims. The racial purity specialists said that deeper research was necessary on the Iranian sect, which the book suggests may have been Mr Sardari’s invention, to ascertain whether its followers were Jewish or not.

His other trump card was a new-style Iranian passport, created by the new regime in Iran in 1925 but which most Europe-based Iranians did not possess. The new identity papers made it much easier to travel across Europe.

His task became even more dangerous when Britain and Russia invaded Iran in September 1941, when he was ordered by Tehran to return home as soon as possible after it signed a treaty with the Allies. But he stayed on regardless, using instead inheritance money to keep his office going after being stripped of his diplomatic immunity and pay.

By December 1942, Adolf Eichmann, the senior Nazi in charge of Jewish affairs, pronounced his argument “the usual Jewish tricks and attempts at camouflage”, in a letter published in Mr Mokhtari’s book.

But Mr Sardari soldiered on, helping families escape from Paris just as tens of thousands of Jews were being deported from France to death camps.

Eliane Senahi Cohanim was seven when she fled France with her family.

Mr Sardari provided them with the passports and travel documents they needed for safe-passage out of Europe, which took a month.

“I think he was like Schindler, at that time, helping the Jews in Paris,” the 78-year old told the BBC from her home in California.

Mr Sardari neither sought nor received much recognition for his efforts in his lifetime and died lonely in a bedsit in Croydon, south London, in 1981.

He had lost his ambassador’s pension and Tehran properties in the Iranian revolution.

His humanitarian work was belatedly recognised in 2004 at a ceremony at the Simon Wiesenthal Centre in Los Angeles.

The author Fariborz Mokhtari said he hoped that the story, and the testimony of survivors, would help undo “popular misconceptions” about Iran and its people and show the “general cultural propensity of Iranians to be tolerant”.

“Here you have a Muslim Iranian who goes out of his way, risks his life, certainly risks his career and property and everything else, to save fellow Iranians,” he says.

“There is no distinction ‘I am Muslim, he is Jew’ or whatever.”

[Image: Abdol-Hossein Sardari was a junior Iranian diplomat in 1940.]

Have I already reblogged this? Oh, I don’t care.

Let yourself be silently drawn by the strange pull of what you really love. It will not lead you astray.
lawofwomen:

Kurdish village girl - they deserve better freedoms!
View high resolution

lawofwomen:

Kurdish village girl - they deserve better freedoms!

persiantiles:


Blue Tiles of Jameh mosque, Yazd, Iran
Via: Pedram Veisi

persiantiles:

Blue Tiles of Jameh mosque, Yazd, Iran

Via: Pedram Veisi

(via )

iranshahr:

Tomb of the Persian poet Ferdowsi. Rebuilt under the orders of Reza Shah between 1928 and 1934.
View high resolution

iranshahr:

Tomb of the Persian poet Ferdowsi. Rebuilt under the orders of Reza Shah between 1928 and 1934.

whistlefortime:

Preparing for kick-off in Iran in 1971.
View high resolution

whistlefortime:

Preparing for kick-off in Iran in 1971.

Don’t normally like these but thought it would be interesting for some un-informed individuals

I’m Iranian. No, I am not a terrorist! The Iranians don’t live in a tent on a desert. I speak Farsi/Persian, not Arabic. Iran is pronounced “EERAUN” and not “I-ran” ( It’s not track & field )… News flash: Iran and Iraq are TWO!!different countries. Middle East is a region and NOT a continent, And camels are not our way of transportation. Belly dancing is an Arabic dance (go figure), it never came from Iran. Al-Kharazmi was a Persian mathematician who invented Algebra and added zero to the number system. Algorithm is from his name. Farabi invented the music notes. Razi invented alcohol. We are the first nation to invent dry cell batteries about 2000 years ago to cover cheap metals with precious ones. We invented modern postal system, first modern university. An irrigation system that can run 4 times around the earth. Iran is the first country on earth to have a lion (male) and a sun (female) for its symbol; and the colors red, white, and green for a flag, The oldest country in the world established 3200 BC. A beautiful country. The best of the Middle East. 

thegreendino:

A view from Tehran, Iran
Not what you see on television, for sure..
View high resolution

thegreendino:

A view from Tehran, Iran

Not what you see on television, for sure..

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